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Photo of section of Denisovan finger
Photo of section of Denisovan finger
Scientists Have Discovered a Hotspot of Denisovan Ancestors
Gizmodo,

Sharon Browning is quoted about new research published in Current Biology that shows the Ayta Magbukun have retained around 5% of their Denisovan ancestry.

Researcher Karen Spaleta prepares a piece of the tusk for the isotopic analyses that revealed the full life history of a woolly mammoth.
Researcher Karen Spaleta prepares a piece of the tusk for the isotopic analyses that revealed the full life history of a woolly mammoth.
Ice Age mammoth’s life story reconstructed in stunning detail
National Geographic,

Story highlights new study examining the tusk of a woolly mammoth that lived about 17,000 years ago. Amy Willis, a core faculty member in UW Biostatistics was a member of the international team that  uncovered details about the animal's activities from birth to death. The team retraced its footsteps across Ice Age Alaska over 28 years, marking the first time scientists have been able to reconstruct a mammoth’s life history in such fine detail.

Woolly mammoth thumb
Woolly mammoth thumb
A Woolly Mammoth's Tusks Reveal a Map of Where it Roamed in Life
The New York Times,

New study co-authored by Biostatistics faculty member Amy Willis is featured, explaining how an international team of scientists used a statistical model to reconstruct the lifetime travel patterns of a woolly mammoth.

Woolly mammoth thumb
Woolly mammoth thumb
Tracking a woolly mammoth
Analysis of a 17,000-year-old fossil has revealed remarkable details about the travel patterns of an Arctic woolly mammoth who, throughout its 28-year life, walked the equivalent of nearly two trips around the world.
Healthcare professional readies a Moderna COVID-19 dose for patient.
Healthcare professional readies a Moderna COVID-19 dose for patient.
Researchers pinpoint 'correlates of protection' for Moderna vaccine
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Hutch News,

In the race to develop new and better vaccines and boosters to block COVID-19, scientists are eagerly seeking laboratory tests that can measure immune responses to quickly show how well these shots are working, instead of waiting months for results of clinical trials involving tens of thousands of people.

Now, a group of top scientists, including Dr. Peter Gilbert, a biostatistician at Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, are reporting that they have defined such measurements — or correlates of protection — for the widely used Moderna mRNA vaccine.