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Global visualization of inferred human ancestral lineages
Global visualization of inferred human ancestral lineages
Massive New ‘Human Family Tree’ Includes 27 Million Ancestors
Gizmodo,

A team of scientists has combined modern and ancient genomes to build a new “genealogy of everyone,” in an achievement that sets the groundwork for future studies into our evolution and global spread. UW Research Professor of Biostatistics Sharon Browning is quoted.

Gilbert presentation, Biostatistics Colloquium 2018
Gilbert presentation, Biostatistics Colloquium 2018
SARS-CoV-2 mutations associated with COVID-19 related hospitalizations
Fred Hutch Science Spotlight,

A multi-division collaboration took a broad, sequence-based approach to reveal which SARS-CoV-2 proteins may drive COVID-19 related hospitalization. These findings were published recently in Scientific Reports. Fred Hutch researcher and University of Washington Professor of Biostatistics Peter Gilbert contributed to this work.

Three elephants in profile against a dark background
Three elephants in profile against a dark background
Biostatisticians help identify and prosecute ivory traffickers
Researchers have unveiled new genetic tools that make it easier for authorities to identify and prosecute criminal organizations involved in ivory trafficking.
Masked people walking down a crowded street
Masked people walking down a crowded street
Pandemic Endgame: What ‘Endemic’ Covid Means—And When We May Get There
Forbes,

Faculty member M. Elizabeth Halloran, who is also an epidemiologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center , says we have not yet reached a stable state with Covid, as evidenced by the “vertical rise of omicron cases” and it was “hard to say” when that might happen, saying, it would depend on the level of immunity within the population and how the virus evolves. 

Photo of Rebecca Hubbard
Photo of Rebecca Hubbard
A Statistician's Life, Celebrating Black History Month
AMSTAT News,

Growing up in West Chester, Pennsylvania—a suburb of Philadelphia—Rebecca Hubbard loved to write stories and poetry. Her dream job was to become a science fiction writer, but she was a practical kid and recognized that probably wouldn’t pay the bills. Since she excelled at science and math, she figured becoming a scientist was a better bet for a stable career.