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In the News

Headlines featuring UW Biostatistics people and research.
NIH photo of neurons
NIH photo of neurons
Alzheimer’s data center at UW awarded $35 million to continue mission of free, global access
UW News,

With funding from the NIH’s National Institute on Aging, the UW center began collecting data from another set of centers housed in hospitals and clinics across the country. These centers, Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers(ADRCs), have now grown in number to 35 — including the ADRC at UW Medicine. Biostatistics faculty members Ellen Wijsman and Ali Shojaie serve as lead and co-investigator, respectively, of the ADRC Data Management and Statistics Core.

Graphic of fading coronavirus spore
Graphic of fading coronavirus spore
‘Post-Vax COVID’ Is a New Disease
The Atlantic,

Eventually we might all have to deal with COVID-19—but a shorter, gentler version, thanks to vaccines. 2021-22 Prentice Endowed Professor and Fred Hutch biostatistician Holly Janes is quoted.

Headshot of Carolyn hutter
Headshot of Carolyn hutter
NIH providing $185 million for research to advance understanding of how human genome functions
National Institutes of Health,

Carolyn Hutter (MS ’09 Biostat, PhD ’08 Epi), director of the NHGRI Division of Genome Sciences, is quoted.

Masked researcher holding vial of blood - Britta Pedersen/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images
Masked researcher holding vial of blood - Britta Pedersen/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images
New Evidence Points To Antibodies As A Reliable Indicator Of Vaccine Protection
NPR,

Fred Hutch biostatisticians and UW faculty members Holly Janes and Peter Gilbert spoke with NPR about new evidence that points to antibodies as a reliable indicator of vaccine protection. David Benkeser (PhD, '15) is also quoted.

Summary of recommendations on the use and reporting of race, ethnicity, and ancestry in genomics research.
Summary of recommendations on the use and reporting of race, ethnicity, and ancestry in genomics research.
Pre-print: Recommendations on the use and reporting of race, ethnicity, and ancestry in genetic research: experiences from the NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program
ArXiv.org,

Commentary and concrete recommendations on the use and reporting of race, ethnicity, and ancestry across the arc of genetic research, including terminology, data harmonization, analysis, and reporting.

Painting of woolly mammoth
Painting of woolly mammoth
Scientists document life of Alaskan wooly mammoth using his tusk
ABC News Times,

Amy Willis was part of the international research team that reconstructed incredible details about the life of a woolly mammoth using isotope and genetic data. 

Photo of section of Denisovan finger
Photo of section of Denisovan finger
Scientists Have Discovered a Hotspot of Denisovan Ancestors
Gizmodo,

Sharon Browning is quoted about new research published in Current Biology that shows the Ayta Magbukun have retained around 5% of their Denisovan ancestry.

Researcher Karen Spaleta prepares a piece of the tusk for the isotopic analyses that revealed the full life history of a woolly mammoth.
Researcher Karen Spaleta prepares a piece of the tusk for the isotopic analyses that revealed the full life history of a woolly mammoth.
Ice Age mammoth’s life story reconstructed in stunning detail
National Geographic,

Story highlights new study examining the tusk of a woolly mammoth that lived about 17,000 years ago. Amy Willis, a core faculty member in UW Biostatistics was a member of the international team that  uncovered details about the animal's activities from birth to death. The team retraced its footsteps across Ice Age Alaska over 28 years, marking the first time scientists have been able to reconstruct a mammoth’s life history in such fine detail.