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In the News

Headlines featuring UW Biostatistics people and research.
Photo of Bruce Weir
Photo of Bruce Weir
Bruce Weir elected to Royal Society for contributions to population genetics, forensic science
UW School of Public Health,

Dr. Bruce Weir, a professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington School of Public Health, has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge for his fundamental contributions to the theory of population and quantitative genetics and to forensic science.

Child walking outdoors holding hand of adult on each side. Courtesy DEOHS.
Child walking outdoors holding hand of adult on each side. Courtesy DEOHS.
Air pollution and high blood pressure in children
UW Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences,

Children exposed to air pollution before birth—even at levels considered acceptable under regulatory standards—are more likely to have increased blood pressure in early childhood and potentially greater risk of developing cardiovascular diseases as adults, according to new research from the University of Washington School of Public Health and partners. Associate Professor of Biostatistics and MS Capstone Program Director Adam Szpiro is a co-author.

Graphic of diverse crowd
Graphic of diverse crowd
Study examines racial inequity in suicide prediction models
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute,

Models that can successfully predict suicides in a general population sample can perform poorly in some racial or ethnic groups, according to a study by Kaiser Permanente researchers published April 28 in JAMA Psychiatry.  Yates Coley, KPWHRI researcher and UW Biostatistics faculty member, is the study's first author. Susan Shortreed, who is also a KPWHRI researcher and a UW Biostatistics faculty member, was part of the research team.

microscopic view of coronarivus dark background
microscopic view of coronarivus dark background
Scientists Are Working On Booster Shots In Case COVID-19 Vaccines Lose Their Effect
NPR,

The COVID vaccines available in the United States today work extremely well at preventing illness, but there are still questions about how long that protection will last and whether they'll work against viral variants that could pop up. Peter Gilbert, biostatistician at the Fred Hutch Vaccine and Infectious Disease and Public Health Sciences Divisions and a UW research professor of biostatistics, is quoted.

Graduate research assistant Kate Crawford conducts research in the Bloom Lab at Fred Hutch, which pivoted to COVID-19 research since the pandemic swept into Washington state in early 2020.
Graduate research assistant Kate Crawford conducts research in the Bloom Lab at Fred Hutch, which pivoted to COVID-19 research since the pandemic swept into Washington state in early 2020.
Latest Fred Hutch research on COVID-19: How Hutch scientists have been tackling coronavirus in lab and clinic
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Hutch News,

Article includes COVID-19 vaccine work by Hutch biostatisticians and UW Biostatistics faculty members Peter Gilbert and Holly Janes.

Headshot of Daniela Witten
Headshot of Daniela Witten
Could the Pandemic Prompt an ‘Epidemic of Loss’ of Women in the Sciences?
The New York Times,

Several studies have found that women have published fewer papers, led fewer clinical trials and received less recognition for their expertise during the pandemic. Daniela Witten, professor of biostatistics and statistics and the Dorothy Gilford Endowed Chair of Mathematical Statistics, is quoted.

Peter Gilbert
Peter Gilbert
Genomic sieve analysis can inform SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development
Medical Xpress,

"Think of the vaccine as a sieve and different variants as pebbles poured into the sieve: the vaccine will block some variants but allow others to pass through, and sieve analysis learns which variants make it through." — Peter Gilbert, biostatistician at the Fred Hutch Vaccine and Infectious Disease and Public Health Sciences Divisions and a UW research professor of biostatistics.

In this Jan. 26, 2021, file photo, registered nurse Diane Miller stands in the "hot zone," defined by red tape on the floor, as she waits to exchange equipment with a colleague who will remain on the other side of the tape in the COVID acute care unit at UW Medical Center-Montlake in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
In this Jan. 26, 2021, file photo, registered nurse Diane Miller stands in the "hot zone," defined by red tape on the floor, as she waits to exchange equipment with a colleague who will remain on the other side of the tape in the COVID acute care unit at UW Medical Center-Montlake in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
UW expert on how ‘genetic ancestry’ can impact reactions to medical treatments
MyNorthwest,

Different races have been found to react differently to certain medical treatments, in part based on an individual’s genetic ancestry. Those genetic health risks are being studied by Dr. Timothy Thornton, a professor, the associate chair of education, and the graduate program director in the department of biostatistics at the University of Washington School of Public Health.