Alumni

Alumni in the News

Headshot of Carolyn hutter
Headshot of Carolyn hutter
NIH providing $185 million for research to advance understanding of how human genome functions
National Institutes of Health,

Carolyn Hutter (MS ’09 Biostat, PhD ’08 Epi), director of the NHGRI Division of Genome Sciences, is quoted.

leek_jeff_updated2021
leek_jeff_updated2021
Biostat alum Jeff Leek receives 2021 COPSS Presidents’ Award
Jeff Leek (PhD ’07, MS ’05) has received one of the top statistical honors, the 2021 Presidents’ Award presented by the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies (COPSS).
Masked researcher holding vial of blood - Britta Pedersen/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images
Masked researcher holding vial of blood - Britta Pedersen/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images
New Evidence Points To Antibodies As A Reliable Indicator Of Vaccine Protection
NPR,

Fred Hutch biostatisticians and UW faculty members Holly Janes and Peter Gilbert spoke with NPR about new evidence that points to antibodies as a reliable indicator of vaccine protection. David Benkeser (PhD, '15) is also quoted.

Healthcare professional readies a Moderna COVID-19 dose for patient.
Healthcare professional readies a Moderna COVID-19 dose for patient.
Researchers pinpoint 'correlates of protection' for Moderna vaccine
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Hutch News,

In the race to develop new and better vaccines and boosters to block COVID-19, scientists are eagerly seeking laboratory tests that can measure immune responses to quickly show how well these shots are working, instead of waiting months for results of clinical trials involving tens of thousands of people.

Now, a group of top scientists, including Dr. Peter Gilbert, a biostatistician at Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, are reporting that they have defined such measurements — or correlates of protection — for the widely used Moderna mRNA vaccine.

Close up of hand holding bottle of Moderna COVID-19 vaccube
Close up of hand holding bottle of Moderna COVID-19 vaccube
Antibody levels predictive of Moderna's vaccine efficacy -study
Reuters,

Finding a surrogate measure of efficacy should speed regulators' decisions on vaccine approval even without large placebo-controlled studies, which could be impracticable to carry out if vaccines become widely available, said Peter Gilbert, a researcher at Fred Hutchinson and an author of the recent study.

Peter Gilbert
Peter Gilbert
Study showing antibody levels protecting against COVID-19 could speed creation of new vaccines, boosters
USA Today,

Eagerly anticipated new research pinpoints antibodies scientists can test for to see if a COVID-19 vaccine is effective. These "correlates of protection" could speed the development of new vaccines or boosters without requiring the enormous clinical trials used to create the first COVID-19 vaccines. This is "the Holy Grail" in terms of vaccines, and one that hasn't yet been set for the virus that causes COVID-19, said Peter Gilbert, co-author of the study posted August 10 to medRxiv and a UW research professor of biostatistics.

headshot of elizabeth krantz
headshot of elizabeth krantz
New study finds many cancer patients have no antibodies to measles or mumps
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Hutch News,

Fred Hutch researcher and UW Biostatistics alum Elizabeth Krantz (MS, '00) co-led a project that examined how much protection cancer patients have against measles and mumps. "Our findings really emphasize the need to increase immunity at the community level, particularly among health care workers or caregivers who have frequent contact with cancer patients."

Photo of Yingye Zheng and Thomas Braun
Photo of Yingye Zheng and Thomas Braun
UW Biostatistics faculty and alumnus named 2021 ASA Fellows
Biostatistics alumni Yingye Zheng (MS’ ‘99, PhD’ 02) and Thomas M. Braun (MS ’96, PhD ’99) have been elected fellows of the American Statistical Association (ASA).
Peter Gilbert
Peter Gilbert
Genomic sieve analysis can inform SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development
Medical Xpress,

"Think of the vaccine as a sieve and different variants as pebbles poured into the sieve: the vaccine will block some variants but allow others to pass through, and sieve analysis learns which variants make it through." — Peter Gilbert, biostatistician at the Fred Hutch Vaccine and Infectious Disease and Public Health Sciences Divisions and a UW research professor of biostatistics.

Headshot of Holly Janes
Headshot of Holly Janes
Holly Janes named Prentice Endowed Professor for 2021-22
Holly Janes has been named the Prentice Endowed Professor for 2021-22. An affiliate professor of biostatistics, Janes is also co-principal investigator of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) Statistics and Data Management Center at Fred Hutch. Last year, HVTN pivoted from HIV vaccine research to focus its expertise on the COVID-19 vaccine effort.