News Archives

2020

Study: Travel bans good for delaying coronavirus, but not stopping it

MyNorthwest
March 28, 2020
A recently-released study found that while travel bans have been useful in slowing the spread of coronavirus, social distancing measures have been far more effective in controlling the epidemic. “Delaying is good because it slows things down,” said the study’s co-author Elizabeth Halloran, a UW professor of biostatistics. “But this idea of reducing the transmissibility is really key.”
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How the Virus Got Out

The New York Times
March 26, 2020
This interactive graphic was created using the data and expertise of Professor of Biostatistics Betz Halloran and others. It analyzed the movements of hundreds of millions of people to show why the most extensive travel restrictions to stop an outbreak in human history haven’t been enough.
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When will the coronavirus pandemic end? What scientists can say about life returning to normal

The Boston Globe
March 21, 2020
Elizabeth Halloran, UW professor of biostatistics and a senior researcher at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, said it’s crucial that the US boost its testing capacity even for people with mild or no symptoms. Studies show that undetected cases drive the growth in epidemics as people who don’t feel severely ill often continue to go about life, infecting those they interact with.
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Study Suggests COVID-19 Might Follow Seasonal Pattern

US News & World Report
March 19, 2020
The coronavirus has an estimated transmission rate of 2.5 or higher, said Elizabeth Halloran, a professor of biostatistics at the University of Washington School of Public Health, in Seattle. "It's going to be difficult, even if it does go down somewhat seasonally in the summer, to bring that down necessarily below 1," Halloran said. "We're looking at a very contagious infection."
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How long will Americans be fighting the coronavirus?

Associated Press
March 18, 2020
“Basically, if I infect one other person or more ... then the epidemic can take off. If I infect less than one person and everybody infects less than one person, then the epidemic will decline,” said Elizabeth Halloran, a disease researcher at the University of Washington.
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Improving Diet/Disease Studies by Using Biomarkers

Medscape
March 18, 2020
The use of biomarkers measured in urine, blood, or other biospecimens could strengthen assessments of diet, says Ross Prentice, PhD, member of the Cancer Prevention Program in the Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, Seattle, Washington. Prentice is also a UW professor of biostatistics.
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Mild Cases May Be Driving Coronavirus Spread

WebMD
March 17, 2020
The article discusses UW Professor of Biostatistics and Fred Hutch researcher Elizabeth Halloran’s Science paper on COVID-19 modeling and preventative measures to limit transmission.
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Coronavirus: Infected people without symptoms are driving epidemic’s fast spread, says new study

San Jose Mercury News
March 16, 2020
The true number of infections will only be known with better and more routine testing, said Betz Halloran of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and UW Professor of Biostatistics.“It’s crucial to help slow the epidemic” because then more people can self-isolate, she said.
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Coronavirus Is Hiding in Plain Sight

The New York Times
March 16, 2020
For every known case of coronavirus, another five to 10 cases are out there undetected, a new study suggests. “It is crucial to implement wide-scale testing,” said Dr. Elizabeth Halloran, a professor of biostatistics at the University of Washington and a senior researcher at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. “And it’s important to develop inexpensive tests so people can get tested whenever they need to be.”
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Mapping the Social Network of Coronavirus

The New York Times
March 13, 2020
To slow the virus, Alessandro Vespignani and other analysts are racing to model the behavior of its human host. “Today, with the enormous computing power available on the cloud, Dr. Vespignani and other colleagues can model the entire world using” publicly available data, said Dr. Elizabeth Halloran, a professor of biostatistics at the University of Washington and a senior researcher at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. “On the one hand, there is the rise of network science, and on the other, there is the enormous rise in computing power.”
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Merkel Gives Germans a Hard Truth About the Coronavirus

The New York Times
March 11, 2020
Dr. Elizabeth Halloran, UW professor of biostatistics, is quoted in this article about German Chancellor Angela Merkel laying out cold, hard facts on the coronavirus. “People in my field have been saying for well over a month that 30 to 60 percent of the world’s population will get infected,” said Halloran.
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Hutch Science: COVID-19

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Hutch News
March 5, 2020
Professor of Biostatistics Elizabeth Halloran is among the Fred Hutch researchers connected to COVID-19. She is working with the World Health Organization on the design of future large-scale trials of coronavirus vaccines.
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Study uncovers new privacy worries for direct-to-consumer DNA testing

PNAS
February 27, 2020
Researchers found several vulnerabilities in the DNA databases of the companies GEDmatch, MyHertiage, FamilyTreeDNA, and Living DNA that could leave users’ personal genetic data at risk of being hacked. The take-home message for consumers, says UW Research Professor Sharon Browning, is that “if they care about their DNA’s privacy, then they shouldn’t upload [their DNA] to these databases.”
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